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Learn About Eye Care


1) What is Blepharitis?

2) Floaters & Flashing Lights

3) Dry Eyes & Dry Eye Syndrome

4) Laser Vision Correction

5) Keratoconus

6) Macular Degeneration

7) Am I Entitled to FREE Eye Care?

8) Did You Know?

9) Glaucoma

10) Cataracts



Keratoconus



Keratoconus is the most common dystrophy of the cornea, affecting around one person in a thousand although some reports indicate prevalence as high as 1 in 500 individuals. It is typically diagnosed in the mid to late teens and attains its most severe state in the twenties and thirties. 

Keratoconus in detail

Keratoconus is a degenerative non-inflammatory disorder of the cornea (the front window of the eye) and generally affects both eyes. The underlying problem is weakness of the supporting collagen fibres in the cornea. This makes the cornea structurally and biomechanically "weak". As a result, the cornea assumes a more conical shape with resultant irregular astigmatism.
The progression of Keratoconus can be quite variable, with some patients remaining stable while others progress rapidly or experience occasional exacerbations over a long and otherwise steady course. A genetic predisposition to keratoconus has been observed, with the disease running within families in 10% of all cases.

How is Keratoconus diagnosed?

From the patient's history, a detailed slit lamp examination as well as sophisticated corneal imagery which can assess the profile of the cornea.

Symptoms of Keratoconus

Symptoms can include substantial distortion of vision (astigmatism), with multiple images, blurry (near- and farsighted) vision and sensitivity to light (photophobia). Initially most people can correct their vision with glasses. But as the astigmatism worsens, most patients can be managed with specially fitted rigid gas permeable contact lenses to reduce the distortion and provide better vision. Symptoms may be unilateral initially and may later become bilateral. In 20% of patients, the condition is progressive and requires surgical intervention.

What are the surgical interventions?

Corneal INTACS

A recent surgical alternative to a corneal transplant is the insertion of intrastromal corneal ring segments.
These are clear, thin prescription inserts placed in the corneal periphery during a brief procedure. The rings act as scaffolding to the cornea providing support, and push out against the curvature of the cornea, flattening the peak of the cone and returning it to a more natural shape. The procedure carried out on an outpatient basis and offers the benefit of being reversible and even potentially exchangeable as it involves no removal of eye tissue.

Corneal Collagen Crosslinking

Corneal Collagen Crosslinking with Riboflavin (also known as C3R) is a new procedure that has been shown to strengthen the weak corneal structure. The cornea is made up of many layers of collagen arranged in a very regular pattern with cross links for strength. In conditions where the cornea is abnormally weak, such as keratoconus, there are fewer of these links and the result is bulging of the cornea. C3R works by increasing collagen cross-linking thereby strengthening the cornea.
The procedure involves application of riboflavin eye drops to the cornea and then using UV light to activate the riboflavin inducing cross links in the cornea.
The development of this new technique is a big step in the management of keratoconus as it addresses the underlying pathophysiology of the condition rather than just treat the symptoms. It is important to emphasise that this procedure slows progression of the disease and patients may still require corrective contact lenses post-operatively.

Corneal Transplantation

This is the last port of call for keratoconus patients and is reserved for those patients with significant corneal scarring or where INTACS and Crosslinking have not been successful or are not suitable.
The procedure involves replacing the diseased cornea with a donor cornea which is secured with very fine stitches. The visual recovery is prolonged but the vast majority of patients have a good outcome.
Newer techniques have also been developed which involve replacing only the diseased anterior cornea rather than the full thickness of the cornea which was common place in the past.

 

(Article reproduced with permission from Consultant Corneal Surgeon - Mr Ali Mearza FRCOphth)

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Why choose P.K. Bahri Ophthalmic Opticians?

  • Over 25 Years experience in private practice and hospital Ophthalmology Departments
  • P.K. Bahri is an Independent Prescribing Ophthalmic Optician BSc(Hons), FCOptom, DipOC, DipClinOptom, DipTp(IP), FAAO
  • P.K. Bahri can treat many eye conditions
  • P.K. Bahri has worked in the world famous Moorfield's Eye Hospital
  • Conditions requiring surgery can be diagnosed and early referrals can be made where necessary

Upminster Practice

Address:
P.K. Bahri Ophthalmic Opticians
172 St Mary's Lane Upminster
Essex RM14 3BT
Email:
info@bahriopticians.co.uk
Phone and Fax No:
01708 228397

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Monday to Friday

9.00am to 5.30pm

Saturday

9.00am to 4.30pm

Closed for lunch

1.00pm to 2.00pm

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CLOSED

Woodford Practice

Address:
P.K. Bahri Ophthalmic Opticians
188 High Road Woodford Green
Essex IG8 9EF
Phone and Fax No:
0208 504 0438

Opening Hours

Monday

9.30am to 5.30pm

Tuesday

9.30am to 5.30pm

Wednesday

9.30am to 7.00pm

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Friday

9.30am to 5.30pm

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Closed for lunch

1.00pm to 2.00pm

Sunday

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